The Danish island of Samsø – a haven for artists, farmers and nature lovers

West of Mols Bjerge is adjacent to the town of Ebeltoft, with a small, unchanged town hall from 1789. The island of Samsø can be seen from here, but must be reached by ferry from Hovu, 25 km (15 mi) south of Aarhus. The Danish island of Samso is a paradise for artists, farmers and nature lovers.

A paradise for artists, farmers and nature lovers, Samsø is famous for its new potatoes and cheese – and wind turbines. In 1997, Samsø won a government competition to become a model community for renewable energy. Now 100% of electricity comes from wind power and biomass. The Baltic island is one of the first industrialized places in the world that is completely energy self-sufficient.

The Danish island of Samsø – a haven for artists, farmers and nature lovers
Hotel Samsio. Photo: Bookings.com

Balen’s beach and village are popular with visitors. The island is served by a bus service that goes around the island, including the two ferry terminals at Sælvig and Ballen. In clear weather the peninsula of Helgenæs is visible to the north.

In the shallow Stavns Fjord lagoon are located most of the smaller islands of Samsø municipality. The largest of these is Hjortholm, and most of the others are just small islands, but individually named. The lagoon is separated from the Kattegat Sea by the 7 km long Besser Re sandbar.

The Danish island of Samsø – a haven for artists, farmers and nature lovers
Tha Samsø Labyrinth. Photo: Visit Samsø

Nordby at the northern end contains an abundance of colorful half-timbered houses as well as small art galleries. Also worth a visit in Nordby is the Samsø Labyrinth, the largest permanent labyrinth in the world. Its 5 kilometers (3 mi) passages wind through dense fir trees covering 6 hectares (15 acres) (60,000 m2), equivalent to 12 football fields. The Samsø Labyrinth has been approved as the largest labyrinth in the world by Guinness World Records.

Related: Viking Fortresses in Denmark

People have lived and hunted on Samsø since the earliest times, when the ice retreated at the end of the last ice age. Samsø first became an island about 9,000 years ago and there are several traces such as dolmens, burial mounds, graves, kitchens, etc. of Stone Age and Bronze Age cultures in the landscape. Excavations at Tønnesminde and Endebjerg, for example, show evidence of human habitation from the Stone Age to the Viking Age.

The Danish island of Samsø – a paradise for artists, farmers and nature lovers, written by Thor Kølberg.

Featured image (top): Tripadvisor photo

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